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Archdiocese of Chicago Schools: Impressive and Improving

Archdiocese of Chicago 26 May 2010 14 Comments

The Archdiocese of Chicago Catholic Schools announced today the results of standardized achievement tests administered in 2010 to third, fifth, and seventh grade students. The test scores demonstrate that, in every major grouping of schools, the students achieved scores above the national average for all subtests.

The average total score (combined performance of Reading, Language, Math) for the 215 elementary schools across Lake and Cook Counties are at the 72nd percentile for third graders, 72nd percentile for fifth graders, and 80th percentile for seventh graders.

Performance on science and social studies tests at schools across the Archdiocese exceeded national norms with: third graders scoring at the 73rd and 75th percentiles, respectively; fifth graders scoring at the 70th and 71st percentiles, respectively; and seventh graders scoring at the 68th and 77th percentiles, respectively.

Total scores of Catholic school students in the City of Chicago were equally impressive with results at the 65th percentile for third grade students, the 65th percentile for fifth grade students and the 74th percentile for seventh grade students.

Further, Catholic school students in Chicago also scored above national norms in science and social studies with: third grade students at the 69th and the 71st percentiles, respectively; fifth grade students at the 63rd percentile and the 64th percentiles; and seventh grade students at the 62nd and 73rd percentiles, respectively.

In Catholic schools supported by the Big Shoulders Fund, where the students are 80 percent minority and 61 percent at the poverty level, every score in all five testing areas was above the national norm.

In the United States, TerraNova tests, published by California-based CTB-McGraw Hill, are widely used by both public and Catholic school systems. TerraNova tests are dually aligned with Archdiocesan curricula and Illinois State Learning Standards.

The Archdiocese of Chicago requires the administration of TerraNova tests to students in grades three, five and seven. Many schools in the Archdiocese elect to administer in other grades. In 2011, the TerraNova will be administered between February 28 and March 11 to students at Catholic elementary schools in Cook and Lake counties.

These test results suggest that the longer a student remains in Archdiocesan schools, the greater his or her achievement.

For more information about Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Chicago, or to locate a Catholic elementary or high school in Cook or Lake Counties, please visit schools.archchicago.org.

14 Comments »

  • Nadel said:

    OK, so what’s the big problem with government run, heavily unionized public schools then? Oh, I see, they’re government run, heavily unionized and obsessed with making sure every seven-year-old has a condom and will accept that “Heather Has Two Moms.” The Catholic schools have been out-performing public schools for decades, at least. This study shows that minority or non-minority, disadvantaged or advantaged, the Catholic schools do it better. Or is it just that the government schools do it worse? There are no secrets to teaching children to read, write and do arithmetic. We were doing it before the 1960s and we can do it again now. We do not need innovation to educate our kids. We need tradition.

  • DM said:

    Come back and talk to me when the Catholic schools have to take every able body that walks through the door: the discipline problems, the A.D.D. deficit disorder kids, the autistic kids, etc. and not be able to kick them out to the neighborhood public school.

    Also, why doesn’t the Catholic Schools release the scores of the individual schools and not group them all together ? Yes, the scores are high at Old St. Pats’ or at St. Mary’s but then it is balanced out by low scores at St. Clotilde or Visitation.

  • Pat Hickey said:

    DM, you need to get out more. Catholic schools do more for less, especially for those with much less than a smug opinion.
    Catholic Schools have had skin in the game since before this City burned.
    Leo High School where I work every day has kids scoring below the 40th percentile on entrance exams and yet educate kids so that 903% go to college – in the most dangerous neighborhood in the city.

  • DM said:

    Still have not answered the question.

    And auburn gresham has a ways to go before equalling Englewood, Roseland, Lawndale in terms of violence, especially considering all the city services that were taken away from the community after the white flight of the 60’s.

  • Pat Hickey said:

    DM says DM said:
    Still have not answered the question. No, DM and that is because you did not ASK (?) a question. You stated, as is common practice, but with a level of snotty self assurance that boils my naturally ironic bemusement to a level of sarcasm.

    because – Thus:

    DM said:
    Come back and talk to me when the Catholic schools have to take every able body that walks through the door: the discipline problems, the A.D.D. deficit disorder kids, the autistic kids, etc. and not be able to kick them out to the neighborhood public school.

    Also, why doesn’t the Catholic Schools release the scores of the individual schools and not group them all together ? Yes, the scores are high at Old St. Pats’ or at St. Mary’s but then it is balanced out by low scores at St. Clotilde or Visitation.

    and also, “. . .and auburn gresham has a ways to go before equalling Englewood, Roseland, Lawndale in terms of violence, especially considering all the city services that were taken away from the community after the white flight of the 60’s.”

    Honor bright? There goes that dog-gone sarcasm again, sorry . . .

    You can not read violent crime statistics, or more likely you have not done, so.

    DM – have a cool drink, watch some TV and leave the real work to others.

  • John Maynard Krebs said:

    DM,
    You may want to ask why parents have to pay twice to send their kids to get an education at Catholic school, and pay only once to not educate their kids at public school.

  • Dan Kelley said:

    Imagine if the private schools had a fraction of the budgetary dollars available to the public school! Catholic schools and other private schools do not have the luxury of billing everybody for school costs, including those who do not have any students enrolled within the system.

  • DM said:

    Hickey:
    Still avoiding the question of why the scores of the individual schools are not posted.

    Krebs:
    Since you stole the name of a famous economist, you should be versed in economic theory to know the meaning of elasticity of demand and be able to answer your own question. But in short, they made a choice, no one forces them to send their children to catholic schools.

    Kelley:
    I like your thinking – if I do not use a government service, I should not have to pay for it. Therefore I want all my money back I pay for public libraries (city and state) because when I want to read a book, I buy it at AMAZON.com.

    Also, I never go to the beach or to the Parks, so I want that money back too.

    My house has never caught on fire and I have never called the police for any reason so I also want that money back too, because I keep a gun in my home and on my person for my own protection (rather judged by twelve than carried by six).

    And to anyone that thinks because they do not send kids to the schools they should not pay, when you need a doctor or lawyer or accountant or any other service, please ask if they were a public school graduate – if they say yes, please decline their services because you feel you should not have had to pay for them.

  • Pat Hickey said:

    DuMass, you have yet to ask a question. You need to have the ability to form an interrogative sentence and that usually requires a genuine interest in something or a level of humility that allows most human beings the opportunity to improve.

    You a have All the answers that you require to continue to be a snotty twerp.

    Had you actually entered the conversation like a gentleman, or at least an adult you would be happily satisfied with robust an helpful conversation – as you merely wedge in like a sneeky little anonymous twerp, you find your self playing with yourself.

  • John Maynard Krebs said:

    “no one forces them to send their children to catholic schools”

    No one forces you to send your children to a training camp for future prisoners, but it is probably a wise decision to skip it.

    So if I have this straight, you can pay taxes and NOT get your children educated or pay twice and get an education.

    JBP

  • DM said:

    I will type slowly so that even the former alter boy can understand:

    Also, why doesn’t the Catholic Schools release the scores of the individual schools and not group them all together ?

    Maybe you can ask a priest to decipher for you if he is not too busy with the alter boys.

  • John Powers said:

    “Also, why doesn’t the Catholic Schools release the scores of the individual schools and not group them all together ?”

    And this is the critical information keeping the public school graduation rates under 50%? Also, isn’t there some issue with subject verb agreement on the plural “schools” and the singular “doesn’t”

    JBP

  • Pat Hickey said:

    Maybe you can play with yourself a little longer, DuMass. Every one else is real busy making a better world and giving the odd metaphor slap to half-wit pains in the a$$. No sense in changing now, Rob’n vagicil – you must be rob’n vagicil – the Glee Club kids must have asked to to bother the Jocks and NHS guys.

    “I will type slowly so that even the former alter boy can understand:

    Also, why doesn’t the Catholic Schools release the scores of the individual schools and not group them all together ?

    Maybe you can ask a priest to decipher for you if he is not too busy with the alter boys.”

  • Mary Vondrak said:

    When I started college back in the 50’s and realized that, even though This article did not surprise me. I graduated from a south-side high school that was considered one of the better ones, I really didn’t know as much as those who came from parochial schools. I made a vow that if I ever had children, they would be educated in parochial schools as well. My husband and I managed to collectively put four kids through archdiocesan schools, paying 52 years worth of tuition. It took a lot of sacrifice but we did it and never regretted it, because it was well worth it. The advantage of the private school system at that time was that you could pick your schools and if you weren’t satisfied with one, you could move your kids to another. Some schools had kids with behavior problems, but they could be disciplined in a different way than at public schools so classes were less disruptive. What the teachers lacked in degrees (some only had certificates), they were well versed in the particular subjects they taught and even though they didn’t “teach to tests,” the scores were high. At the time I believe the archdiocese was the fourth largest school system in the country.

    Note: DM, what sort of alteration do the boys do that keep the priests busy?

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